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  • FIELD & MAIN BANK ANNOUNCES PROMOTIONS ON ITS TRUST SERVICES TEAM - JUNE 13, 2015

    HENDERSON, KENTUCKY
    June 13, 2016
     

    Nikki Bowling has been promoted to Vice President, Trust & Retirement Services Officer. She holds degrees in Banking Operations from American Banker’s Association and an Associate’s Degree in Arts & Science from Henderson Community College. She is a 2014 graduate from the Cannon Financial Institute and holds the Institute of Certified Banker’s designation of Certified IRA Services Professional (CISP). Bowling oversees IRAs and qualified retirement plans, including 401(k) plans, pension plans, SEP-IRA plans and SIMPLE IRA plans. She also administers personal trust and investment agency accounts. Bowling has been with Field & Main Bank since 1999. Before working in Trust Services, Bowling served as manager of the downtown Henderson banking center. She lives in Henderson with her husband Brandon and their two children. 

    David Riley has been promoted to Vice President, Trust Services Officer. Riley serves as a first point of contact, helping current and prospective clients identify their investment goals and objectives. He manages client account relationships and serves as a resource to the broader Field & Main team by remaining current on the evolving investments landscape. A member of Field & Main since 2013, Riley brings 25 years of financial services experience to his work. He is an active community member, serving on the Green Valley Baptist Association as chairman of the finance team. Riley attended Lockyear College in Evansville and currently resides in Henderson with his wife Linda. 

     

    Field & Main Bank is a Kentucky-chartered community bank dedicated to serving Kentucky and Indiana with strong leadership, convenient banking facilities and new modern craft banking. It was formed through the merger of Ohio Valley Financial Group and BankTrust Financial. Learn more at www.fieldandmain.com. Member FDIC.

    Investments are not insured by the FDIC or any federal government agency, provide no bank guarantee, are not a deposit and may lose value.